The White Lily Blog


Tea Party, or Sex Socialism? You Decide!

A post on Italian blog Cordialiter  was re-posted recently with commentary on Rorate Caeli.  Cordialiter says Catholics must not get trapped in the box the media has prepared for it, a false choice between Tea Party traditionalism or Socialist-flavored modernism. The blog says on the contrary, traditionalists must be ‘”True friends of the poor” and proceeds not exactly to say how to do that, but very definitely how not to do so: by accepting the perks of middle class existence, ignoring the social issues and focusing on worthy liturgy. That would be wrong, in Cordialiter’s thinking.

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Fashion and Faith, Again
June 10, 2014, 2:18 pm
Filed under: Culture and Catholicism, Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

It is Pentecost Sunday at a traditional Catholic church west of Chicago. It is June, cooler this morning than yesterday, with a little rain and thunder during the night so that the air is utterly clear of moisture, and in the diamond-bright lemon-yellow sunshine pouring full upon us from the east stained glass, every dressing of the altar is in sharp focus. Continue reading



Is Pro-Life Winning?

Joe Jensen, the youth outreach activist employed by Chicago’s venerable Pro-Life Action League, has recently written a piece for the Bellarmine Forum in which he discusses the gains the pro-life movement has achieved since 1973.  It’s a lot, according to the report.  Jensen lists these accomplishments:  it has kept abortion and its 55 million victims in American faces on the front pages of hometown newspapers, with graphic photos and sickening details ; because of this steady media attention, more people are becoming pro-life, including most doctors, who now refuse to do abortions, and also, with all the attention to health code violations and numerous abuses, many ‘clinics’ have been shut down.  Even more significant, there is a strongly growing trend in tough legislation protecting the baby at a state level.  Besides all that, help is being offered to women through the many sidewalk counselors, pregnancy resource centers, and counseling initiatives like Project Rachel and Rachel’s Vineyard.

These are real achievements, and the growing anti-abortion trend is so clear that even NPR’s recent segment on abortion reported that the Supreme court has become much more ‘conservative’ and may surprise us and reverse its decades-long promotion of infant death by calling those buffer zones around clinics that limit access to sidewalk counselors to the women entering to abort ‘unconstitutional.’ Yes!

But hold the champagne. Continue reading



Why the Doctrine Matters: Christopher Caldwell on the Church, the Council, and the Crisis in Europe

Christopher Caldwell’s Reflections on the Revolution in Europe makes many startling assertions and observations regarding developments in Europe in the past fifty years, but to those of us following the unfolding drama of revisionist Rome against tradition, none so interesting as this one: Vatican II disarmed Europe.  Caldwell is no theologian, he is on the contrary most often a financial writer. But that makes his thesis the more compelling. Continue reading



Really Pro-Life Platform for a Christian Third Party

The Spanish have a saying, Pan para hoy, hambre para mañana, or Bread for today, hunger for tomorrow, and that just about nails down the economic implications of the rush for homosexual marriage. Businesses filed Friend of the Court briefs in huge numbers before the Supreme Court decision, and Marriott summed it up in their celebratory statement as reported by NPR: gays have more disposable income than families with kids, and we want that dough. Mars bars, Apple, Starbucks, Amazon, New York Life and Levi Strauss, 278 in all were eager to throw marriage under the bus for a cut of the action.

That bread dough has a shelf-life, of course. It expires with the next generation–oops, what generation? And then we shall know the hunger. Continue reading



Liberians Call for Christian State

Liberian citizens have very recently called for a ‘Christian religious state’  demonstrating religious tolerance for other faiths, but not ‘religious liberty’ when defined exactly as we define it in the United States.  They specifically reject that. It is one of the most interesting political moves in centuries. Continue reading



Ruby Turpin is the Church Triumphant, and Flannery Takes Her Down

Pius X wrote Pascendi in 1907 to warn us of a special danger: modernist heretics fight dirty. Unlike the heretics of the past, they conceal their true agenda and don’t even leave the Church.  And they employ a special rhetorical device, confusion. They decline, Pius X wrote, to lay out their thought coherently, but spread it out in a confused or puzzling way so that the full meaning is not immediately apparent, or bury it in bits in otherwise orthodox material which the unorthodox fragments contradict but very quietly. (And you thought it was you!)

It is not that modernists don’t wish to be understood, but rather from experience (advertising, for one) know  they can trust that the whole meaning will reassemble itself in the reader’s psyche later, carried there past security by the shell of orthodoxy. They’re sidestepping a fair fight, to get into the heart. Think virus.

 Their cynical tactic proves to be successful.  They can even target niche audiences, it would seem. Consider, for example, that, judging from copious online reports, tenth graders ‘get’ Flannery O’Connor, while traditional Catholic school administrators apparently don’t. Continue reading




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