The White Lily Blog


Sarah Says Turn and Face Your God

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I am reading Zola’s work on Lourdes. It focuses on that most extreme contradiction between our Faith and modernism, when the doctors have given up on certain hard cases, and in desperation the suffering people bring their awful pain to Our Lady at Lourdes and ask for a miracle.

A miracle. God intervening in our behalf to reverse nature and to cure us. Continue reading



Ruby Turpin is the Church Triumphant, and Flannery Takes Her Down

Pius X wrote Pascendi in 1907 to warn us of a special danger: modernist heretics fight dirty. Unlike the heretics of the past, they conceal their true agenda and don’t even leave the Church.  And they employ a special rhetorical device, confusion. They decline, Pius X wrote, to lay out their thought coherently, but spread it out in a confused or puzzling way so that the full meaning is not immediately apparent, or bury it in bits in otherwise orthodox material which the unorthodox fragments contradict but very quietly. (And you thought it was you!)

It is not that modernists don’t wish to be understood, but rather from experience (advertising, for one) know  they can trust that the whole meaning will reassemble itself in the reader’s psyche later, carried there past security by the shell of orthodoxy. They’re sidestepping a fair fight, to get into the heart. Think virus.

 Their cynical tactic proves to be successful.  They can even target niche audiences, it would seem. Consider, for example, that, judging from copious online reports, tenth graders ‘get’ Flannery O’Connor, while traditional Catholic school administrators apparently don’t. Continue reading



The Restore Point in Health Care is Christ and His Church

 

As part of the health care debate, Dr. Jeffrey Sachs uncompromisingly indicts capitalism on NPR’s production of the Commonwealth Club on October 26; it is apparently not archived, but similar views may be expected in his book, The Price of Civilization. His conclusion is wrong, insofar as he ultimately recommends, like the Wall Street protesters whom he admires,  only that we tax the very rich. Continue reading



Read My Mens

Although many traditional mass sites are singing anthems to  Benedict for it, for those who are aware of the unaddressed doctrinal chasm between the old mass and the new, Universae ecclesiae is a liberal ransom note on the table : we’ve got your mass and we’re going to enrich her. Bring a million souls in unmarked bills, or else!

Continue reading



Way to Woman-Up: The Girls Who Save(d) England

Sometimes one learns well from one’s detractors, and this is the case with John Bossy’s work on the Reformation.  He tells the story of Catholic women of the gentry during that bloody time.  (Apparently they are still causing mischief to the bad guys.)  Continue reading



Gherardini to Holy Mother Church: Examine the Council!

Msgr. Bruno Gherardini has served as a canon of St. Peter’s Basilica, undersecretary of the Pontifical Academy of Theology, professor emeritus at the Pontifical Lateran University, and postulator of the canonization cause of Blessed Pope Pius IX. He is now eighty-five years old and has been called the last living theologian of the pre-Conciliar “Roman School.” In 2009, he released The Ecumenical Vatican Council II: a Much Needed Discussion.  Because of his credentials, and because of his independence from traditionalist organizations, the book is especially important.  It provides a firm response to those who say that ‘the council was fine but the implementation was wrong’, or that the ‘only thing wrong with Vatican II was the mass that accompanied its implementation.’  Gherardini argues clearly that the Council has doctrinal issues that cannot be dismissed.  Continue reading



The Council Pow-Wow and Pro-Life

Pro-life Catholics usually take the attitude toward pro-choice Catholic politicians that they are ‘renegade Catholics,’ acting outside the teaching of the Church regarding the definition of human life. We marvel that ‘dissidents’ continue to function within Catholic circles, unchallenged, receiving communion, teaching at Catholic schools, and even living in Catholic seminaries and convents.

Why is error so persistent? Isn’t Catholicism clear? Continue reading